L1.8 Pluralism & Religion in North America

L1.8 Pluralism & Religion in North America

L1.8 Pluralism & Religion in North America

$295.00$325.00

Most people recognize the changes occurring. Even in small towns, there’s usually a Chinese restaurant in addition to typical American fare. A referral to a new physician may introduce you to a doctor who is from India or the Middle East. In urban areas, mosques dot the landscape as do churches. Alongside Christian churches and Jewish synagogues, people from different parts of the world bring religions that are new to many Americans: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam and many others.

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Course Description

Most people recognize the changes occurring. Even in small towns, there’s usually a Chinese restaurant in addition to typical American fare. A referral to a new physician may introduce you to a doctor who is from India or the Middle East. In urban areas, mosques dot the landscape as do churches. Alongside Christian churches and Jewish synagogues, people from different parts of the world bring religions that are new to many Americans: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam and many others. When a culture has different sets of beliefs and assumptions engaging with each other, the term used to describe it is pluralism.
In this course, the focus is pluralism of religious belief in America today. No longer are the “religions of the world” practiced in another part of the world. Instead, different religions are practiced in our communities and neighborhoods. Recognizing this shift, we’ll explore some major aspects of the pluralistic beliefs commonly encountered today.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the growing dimensions of pluralism in North America.
  • Summarize key elements of the faith experience shared by Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and American Indian people.
  • Recognize expressions of faith among members of a major religion different from one’s own.
  • Explain the importance of religion and pluralism as they evolve in North America.

Required Texts

  • Coogan, Michael D. (2003). The Illustrated Guide to World Religions. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.