L3.2 Supervised Ministry 5: Pastoral Approaches for Those Living With Mental Illness

L3.2 Supervised Ministry 5: Pastoral Approaches for Those Living With Mental Illness

L3.2 Supervised Ministry 5: Pastoral Approaches for Those Living With Mental Illness

$295.00$305.00

The Supervised Ministry Series is designed to provide a practical internship in pastoral ministry over an eighteen-month progression.  The arc of this series begins with entering a new place of ministry and concludes with leaving a place of ministry. Along this arc, participants will explore issues of pastoral identity, ethics, and organizational dynamics.

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Course Description

SUPERVISED MINISTRY OVERVIEW

The Supervised Ministry Series is designed to provide a practical internship in pastoral ministry over an eighteen-month progression.  The arc of this series begins with entering a new place of ministry and concludes with leaving a place of ministry. Along this arc, participants will explore issues of pastoral identity, ethics, and organizational dynamics.

A requirement for the Supervised Ministry Series is to be engaged in pastoral ministry with a site supervisor for approximately 6 to 8 hours each week.  It is assumed that participants will be involved in pastoral ministry between the scheduled courses and arrange appropriate time off with the site supervisor.  Participants are required to meet with site supervisors every two weeks and site supervisors are asked to complete reports on those meetings. The coursework does not substitute for supervision of actual experience in ministry.  Instead, it provides a focused learning experience to gain a greater understanding of what competent and ethical pastoral ministry requires.

Participants may serve in any established setting for authorized ministry.  The usual placement will be in a local church. Some participants may be serving in institutional chaplaincies or community outreach programs.  The requirements for the place of ministry are that it be established, that the participant’s role is clearly designated as a ministerial position, and that the site supervisor be an authorized minister approved by the PATHWAYS Director.  The site supervisor may be engaged in ministry elsewhere but needs to be able to see the participant in the ministry setting. (For example, the site supervisor may be the pastor of a neighboring church while the participant is serving in a congregation without an authorized minister on staff.)

During the eighteen-month period, the participant should serve in no more than two different settings.  An essential part of pastoral ministry is to build relationships with people, allow them to grow, and to appropriately end those relationships.  This process, which is at the heart of pastoral ministry, takes time to evolve.

The Director of PATHWAYS has authority to approve both the setting for ministry and the site supervisor.  To be enrolled in Supervised Ministry courses, a participant is required to be engaged in ministry in an approved setting and have a site supervisor.  Questions can be directed to the Director of PATHWAYS.

Course Description

People within the Christian community carry many different kinds of wounds.  Pastoral care is often thought of in the context of wounds from physical illness and medical treatment or in other times of personal crisis.  An overlooked dimension of pastoral care is mental health–an often hidden wound that people carry. In general, most local churches are ill-equipped to support people and families faced with mental disorders.  Simply making referrals to mental health providers does not discharge the responsibility of the pastor or church to offer supportive care and inclusion as members of the community of faith.

During this section of Supervised Ministry, you will learn about the most prevalent categories of what psychologists call mental disorders.  A mental disorder is a persistent change in behavior, emotion, and thinking which impacts a person’s ability to function in day to day activities. In addition to gaining a better understanding of common disorders, this course provides the opportunity to consider how to be pastorally supportive based on case studies and theological reflection.  By considering these issues in the context of supervised ministry, you will be able to develop strategies, which can assist you as a pastoral leader as those in your care experience mental disorders.

Learning Objectives

  • To formulate an approach to pastoral ministry which supports the wholeness of individuals and families living with mental health disorders.
  • To create approaches for providing support for individuals and families living with mental health disorders in specific places of ministry.
  • To differentiate among key elements of particular forms of mental disorders.

Required Texts

  • Albers, Robert H. (Ed.), Meller, William H. (Ed.), Thurder, Steven D. (Ed.) (2012). Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families. Fortress Press.

About the text for this course:

Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families was selected for this course because of the in-depth background it provides both on mental illness and theological reflection as well as case studies, which provide clear examples and illustrations.   However, please be aware that because it was published in 2012, the references to the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (the DSM) are somewhat out of date. In 2015, the DSM-5 was published, making revisions to many diagnostic categories, with supplemental updates in 2017. These changes are important for clinicians who diagnose and treat disorders.  However, the general background on mental disorders contained in Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families remains relevant and applicable to pastoral care.